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Affordable SEO Comes In Fast or Good: Which Do You Prefer?

Affordable SEO is a tough term to define, because depending on your business’ precise financial circumstances, the kinds of ways that you can afford something can change pretty dramatically. But let’s assume that you’ve figured out which services you can afford: there’s another decision you have to make. Like most things in life, SEO can be any two of affordable, fast, or high-quality.

Fast, affordable SEO
Fast, in this case, measures the amount of time it takes you to achieve a first page placement. Fast SEO might still take a month or two, but during that time you’ll be able to track your climb through the rankings. It’s exhilarating to watch — but of course it comes at a price.

Fast SEO isn’t truly high-quality SEO, which means that while you’ll reach the first page quickly, you won’t ever reach first place. To break into the top few spots for almost any keyword takes a pretty extraordinary investment — and for any keyword that’s actually worth breaking into, it can take months of strategy, planning, and execution. On the other hand, studies have shown that some 40% of clicks go to that top slot — and only 8% make it to the person in the #4 position. So it can be worth the wait when you finally get there.

High quality, affordable SEO
The other option, then, is to go for the high-quality links right out of the gate. Skipping things like directory submissions and press releases, the high-quality approach goes for links that require a lot more individual work, but are worth a lot more as well. Blog posts, social media mentions, article writing and distribution.

The downside, as you might imagine, is the pain of waiting month after month as your website crawls from number 12 to number 11 to number 10. The upside is that once you reach number one — often a year or more later — you’re not going to be toppled by some upstart with a decent SEO strategist and a slightly larger budget.

Targeted Email Marketing, We’ve Got Your Number (It’s 91)

If you’re not already familiar with targeted email marketing, here it is in a mere sixteen words: surfers give you permission to send them emails, and you market to them with those emails. It’s called “targeted” because (presumably) people wouldn’t give you permission to send them emails if they didn’t want to receive them, and it’s called “marketing” because you intend to get them to purchase something.

So what does the number 91 have to do with targeted email marketing? Simple: 91 is the right number of days to send someone email. This is controversial, and the Los Angeles SEO company I’m ghostwriting this blog for probably doesn’t want me telling you this. They’d rather you never stop sending email to someone once you start, and there’s a couple of reasons why:

1) Lists look impressive when you can say you have 10,000 or 50,000 subscribers. If you drop a customer after 91 days, you probably won’t ever reach those numbers.

2) Emailing lists are generally charged by the number of people on them — so those big numbers mean more money for the company administrating the list.

But the reasons why 91 days is optimal for you, as a small business doing targeted email marketing, are pretty decent:

1) Emailing lists are generally charged by the number of people on them. You don’t need to spend money sending emails to people that aren’t paying attention to your emails anymore.

2) If people haven’t purchased anything from your emails after three months (90 days), it’s time to hit them with one last, super-amazing jaw-dropping offer on the last day — the 91st day — and if they don’t respond to that, drop them like a bad habit.

If they do reply to an offer, make sure that as a part of that offer, they sign up for your other mailing list — the one for people that have been proven to reply to offers. THAT mailing list, you should keep people on forever, because once people have proven that they’re willing to buy from you, they’re much more likely to buy again…and again.

Small Business SEO And The Art of the ‘Service’ Page

Small business SEO is a fairly straightforward affair as far as SEO is concerned. You have a page, you have some keywords you’ve researched, and you optimize the page so that it ranks well for those keywords. Everyone’s pretty familiar with the first step — but what do you do when you’ve optimized for all of the keywords you can reasonably fit on your landing page?

You have to make another page, naturally. Many SEO companies will develop a specific landing page just to fit some new keywords on, but that’s inefficient and can actually penalize your page if Google decides that your ‘spare’ landing pages are low-quality or otherwise detract from the rest of your site.

Instead, we encourage small businesses to develop their ‘services’ page into a landing page. The services page is the second page seen by most surfers — they land on your landing site, they’re not quite ready to buy yet, so they look for more information. The services page is the natural selection. But there’s no particular reason you shouldn’t be promoting your services page as though it was a landing page.

Consider: the services page is where surfers go to lean about your product. That’s what your landing page is basically intended to do as well, right? Also, your services page had better have a strong call-to-action on it (just like your landing page), or you’ll lose out on people who are on the verge of a buying decision once they read about how awesome your services are.

In fact, in almost every way, your services page acts like a selling page — it just doesn’t have to have the big shiny banner and other niceties that a “normal” landing page does. It’s an optimal opportunity to expand the keywords you’re pursuing with your website’s SEO while offering your surfers a ‘shortcut’ to what they consider the important part: the answer to the classic buyer’s question “What’s in it for me?”